Day: October 21, 2015

20 OF THE STRANGEST PHOBIAS PEOPLE ACTUALLY EXPERIENCE. – Thousand Thoughts

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A phobia is defined as “an extreme or irrational fear of or aversion to something.” Some phobias, like arachnophobia, are pretty rational because, let’s face it: spiders are terrifying. On the other hand, there are some phobias out there that are pretty strange. In the end, every one of us is afraid of something. Here are 20 bizarre phobias that people actually have.

1) Heliophobia: the fear of the sun, sunlight, or any bright light.

2) Chaetophobia: the fear of hair. They may also fear the hair on their own body. Some only fear detached or loose hair and do not mind attached hair.

3) Arachibutyrophobia: the fear of peanut butter sticking to the roof of the mouth.

4) Haphephobia: the fear of touch. It is a rare but often devastating phobia. Most people with haphephobia fear being touched by anyone.

5) Oikophobia: an abnormal fear of home surroundings.

6) Ablutophobia: the persistent, abnormal, and unwarranted fear of bathing, washing, or cleaning.

7) Ergophobia: an abnormal and persistent fear of work.

8) Nomophobia: the fear of being out of mobile phone contact. It is, however, arguable that the word “phobia” is misused and that in the majority of cases it is only a normal anxiety.

9) Philophobia: the abnormal, persistent and unwarranted fear of falling in love or emotional attachment.

10) Somniphobia: the often irrational and excessive fear of sleep.

11) Globophobia: a fear of balloons and also balloons popping sound.

12) Ombrophobia: an irrational fear of rain.

13) Geniophobia: an extreme unwarranted fear and/or physical aversion to chins.

14) Trypophobia: the fear of holes. (Don’t google this phobia)

15) Pogonophobia: is the extreme dislike of beards.

16) Hippopotomonstrosesquipedaliophobia: the fear of Long words.

17) Lipophobia: the fear of becoming fat.

18) Genuphobia: the fear of one’s own knees, someone else knees, or the act of kneeling.

19) Sanguivoriphobia: the fear of vampires.

20) Myrmecophobia: the inexplicable fear of ants.

 

What Phobia do you experience?

MICRODOSING- HOW THIS REVOLUTIONARY WAY OF USING PSYCHEDELICS IMPROVES MENTAL AND PHYSICAL ABILITIES.

Using-Psychedelics

Let’s talk about microdosing.

Taking sub-perceptual amounts of psychedelics (6-25 microgram LSD, 0.2-0.5 gram dried mushrooms, 50-75 microgram mescaline HCL), while maintaining your daily routine, playing sports, or performing any other activity, has been proven to increase mental capabilities as well as physical ones. Using psychedelics in this low-dose capacity, also referred to aspsycholytic doses, doesn’t have the same effect as a hearty Terence McKenna dose does; psycholytic doses do not inhibit ego-functioning in the same aspect.

The author of Tryptamine Palace: 5-MeO-DMT and the Sonoran Desert Toad, James Oroc, conducted his own studies with microdosing and discovered “cognitive functioning, emotional balance, and physical stamina were actually found to be improved.”

He goes on to say,

Virtually all athletes who learn to use LSD at psycholytic dosages believe that the use of these compounds improves both their stamina and their abilities. According to the combined reports of 40 years of use by the extreme sports underground, LSD can increase your re- flex time to lightning speed, improve your balance to the point of perfection, increase your concentration until you experience ‘tunnel vision,’ and make you impervious to weakness or pain. LSD’s effects in these regards amongst the extreme-sport community are in fact legendary, universal, and without dispute.”

Oroco even suggests that, in some extreme sports subcultures, microdosing at any physical competition is regarded as cheating.

But what about in schooling? Would it be considered cheating if someone were to use microdosing to help themselves learn? P.G. Stafford and B.H. Golightly, authors of LSD — The Problem-Solving Psychedelic, wrote about a student who was attempting to learn German. This student made massive leaps and bounds under the influence of small doses of LSD. These are the student’s words:

“It was a week before registration and it depressed me tremendously that I had not spent the summer learning German, as I had planned. I had intended to give myself a crash course so I could take second-year German, which I needed for my study in physics. I had heard of a woman who had learned enough Spanish in a few days, via LSD, to speak it fluently when she had to go to Mexico on business.

I had taken LSD before, and while I couldn’t see how she did this, I decided it was worth a try. I hadn’t even gotten around to picking up a textbook, but I did have a close friend who knew German well and who said he was willing to “sit in” while I took the drug and try to teach me the language.

Fortunately, I knew something about conjugation and declension, so I wasn’t completely at sea. I wanted to get worked up and feel involved with the language, as it seemed that this must be at least part of the key to the problem, so I asked my friend to tell me about Schiller and Goethe, and why the verb came at the end. Almost immediately, after just a story or two, I knew I had been missing a lot in ignoring the Germans, and I really got excited. The thing that impressed me at first was the delicacy of the language (he was now giving me some simple words and phrases), and though I really messed it up, I was trying hard to imitate his pronunciation as I had never tried to mimic anything before.

For most people German may be “guttural,” but for me it was light and lacey. Before long, I was catching on even to the umlauts. Things were speeding up like mad, and there were floods of associations. My friend had only to give me a German word, and almost immediately I knew what it was through cognates. It turned out that it wasn’t even necessary for him to ask me what it sounded like.

Memory, of course, is a matter of association, and boy, was I ever linking up to things! I had no difficulty recalling words he had given me—in fact, I was eager to string them together. In a couple of hours after that I was reading even some simple German, and it all made sense.

The whole experience was an explosion of discoveries. Normally, when you’ve been working on something for a long time and finally discover a solution, you get excited, and you can see implications everywhere. Much more than if you heard someone else discovering the same-thing. Now this discovery thing, that’s what was happening with me—but all the time.

The threshold of understanding was extremely low, so that with every new phrase I felt I was making major discoveries. When I was reading, it was as though I had discovered the Rosetta Stone and the world was waiting for my translation. Really wild!”

With this information, we can see that small doses of LSD can really improve cognitive abilities! There was a study done by James Fadiman in the 1960’s that is still considered to be one of the most significant on this topic. In this study, Fadiman researched the effect of taking 100mcg of LSD when faced with long-term problems that participants were unable to solve. When the participants were finally able to present their solutions, they were reviewed by a panel of experts in the same field. What did the participants end up discovering? The Morning News’ Tim Doody answers that for us:

“LSD absolutely had helped them solve their complex, seemingly intractable problems. And the establishment agreed. The 26 men unleashed a slew of widely embraced innovations shortly after their LSD experiences, including a mathematical theorem for NOR gate circuits, a conceptual model of a photon, a linear electron accelerator beam-steering device, a new design for the vibratory microtome, a technical improvement of the magnetic tape recorder, blueprints for a private residency and an arts-and-crafts shopping plaza, and a space probe experiment designed to measure solar properties.”

Since psychedelics are “non-specific amplifiers”, it is not just creativity and cognitive function that are enhanced- the distressing states of the mind can also become more lively. However, in small doses this is not so overwhelming and can therefore be very beneficial.

In the Journal of Humanistic Psychology, Myron Stolaroff wrote about the benefits of using psychedelics in meditation:

“The use of low doses often can be much more effective in dealing with our “psychic garbage.” Many do not care for low doses because they can stir up uncomfortable feelings, and they prefer to transcend them by pushing on into higher states, but it is precisely these uncomfortable feelings that must be resolved to achieve true freedom.

With low doses, by focusing directly on the feelings and staying with them without aversion and without grasping, they will in time dissipate. Resolving one’s repressed feelings in this manner clears the inner being, permitting the True Self to manifest more steadily. Such a result provides greater energy, deeper peace, more perceptive awareness, greater clarity, keener intuition, and greater compassion. It permits the deepening of one’s meditation practice. The surfacing of buried feelings that this procedure permits often can bring new understanding of one’s personality dynamics.”

Our potential for improving ourselves with microdosing (mentally, physically, and spiritually) is limitless. It is safe to say that everything in life is balance, so with the good must come the not-so-good. Luckily, the not-so-good parts of microdosing are managable, and worth the experience. So let’s take a look at the five categories of overall effects of microdosing so we can see both sides of the coin. These findings were gathered from a personal survey conducted, and first person reports via Martijn Shirp.

Physical:

  • More overall energy, like a psychedelic coffee. A buzzing effect.
  • Being able to walk very long distances without tiring.
  • Need of extra sleep at the end of the day, feeling more drained than usual.
  • Sometimes an uncomfortable stomach feeling, heavy body load.
  • More relaxed and better focus.

Emotional:

  • More appreciation for little things.
  • A resonance and openness by which world seems to invade more deeply and I have a more playful way of relating to this invasion.
  • Anti-depressive qualities, improved mood.
  • More patience.
  • Personal issues are at times disturbing.
  • Enhanced emotional clarity.

Perceptual:

  • Music is better, more persuasive in guiding inner states.
  • Sometimes objects seem to glow, having an aura surround them.
  • Time perception is warped.
  • Enhanced sense of touch, smell and hearing. Sometimes synesthesia.

Creative:

  • More flow.
  • A fuller awareness of the entanglement of ideas, a richer and seemingly higher overview and increased association.
  • Comprehension of ideas is greatly enhanced.

Spiritual:

  • Increased awareness of universal connectedness, in a marvelous, enlightening and almost divine way.

If you want to be able to experiment with these states of consciousness in a safe and constructive way, I suggest following these guidelines from Shirp:

  • Start out with a dose on the lower end of the psycholytic spectrum and record how you react to it. A microdosing regime that is too high makes you incapable of following your normal routine with the risk of staying in the limbo/coming up phase the whole time, which is neither beneficial nor trippy and can often be uncomfortable.
  • Follow your normal routine, especially sleeping, eating, working and spiritual practice.
  • Be conservative with consecutive doses. Building a tolerance is unlikely, but having a normal baseline improves integrity of action.
  • Be discreet to whom you tell. Disinformation, stigma and prejudice are still mainstream.

“To make this trivial world sublime, take half a gram of phanerothyme”Aldous Huxley

Written by Raven Fon

Source: http://iheartintelligence.com/

What Will You Leave Behind? – Thousand Thoughts

“Man is literally split in two: he has an awareness of his own splendid uniqueness in that he sticks out of nature with a towering majesty, and yet he goes back into the ground a few feet in order blindly and dumbly to rot and disappear forever” – Ernest Becker

Why is it that when we are ultimately happy, or in love for example, that there is also an element of sadness? It is because we know that at that very point in time it is temporary, we see it’s transience. Should we take the approach of letting go of all things in that case, detachment? Silva argues the opposite and thinks we should instead be trying to extend this moment through our endless creative possibilities as human beings.

“I’m tortured by the idea that everything is temporary and I’m fighting against impermanence. Inspiration is fleeting: it comes and goes. So what do you do with that inspiration? Well if you’re an architect, you create a building. You instantiate that inspiration. The goal of humanity is to instantiate the mind in the world, transform imagination into a tangible thing that’s – at least on a human scale – able to persist despite our own impermanence. With media, and I’m trying to grab these fleeting moments of exaltation, these lightening bolts of meaning that I have when I’m inspired and turn that inspiration into a solid thing that’ll persist post-epiphany.” -Jason Silva

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WHAT WILL YOU LEAVE BEHIND?

TELL US IN THE COMMENTS BELOW

Top 5 Regrets Of People Close To Death. – Thousand Thoughts

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The following article is written by a nurse who reveals the top 5 regrets people make on their deathbed.

For many years I worked in palliative care. My patients were those who had gone home to die. Some incredibly special times were shared. I was with them for the last three to twelve weeks of their lives. People grow a lot when they are faced with their own mortality.1

I learnt never to underestimate someone’s capacity for growth. Some changes were phenomenal. Each experienced a variety of emotions, as expected, denial, fear, anger, remorse, more denial and eventually acceptance. Every single patient found their peace before they departed though, every one of them.

When questioned about any regrets they had or anything they would do differently, common themes surfaced again and again. Here are the most common five regrets of people close to death:

 

1. I WISH I’D HAD THE COURAGE TO LIVE A LIFE TRUE TO MYSELF, NOT THE LIFE OTHERS EXPECT OF ME.1

This was the most common regret of all. When people realize that their life is almost over and look back clearly on it, it is easy to see how many dreams have gone unfulfilled. Most people had not honoured even a half of their dreams and had to die knowing that it was due to choices they had made, or not made.

It is very important to try and honour at least some of your dreams along the way. From the moment that you lose your health, it is too late. Health brings a freedom very few realise, until they no longer have it.

 

2. I WISH I DIDN’T WORK SO HARD.

This came from every male patient that I nursed. They missed their children’s youth and their partner’s companionship. Women also spoke of this regret. But as most were from an older generation, many of the female patients had not been breadwinners. All of the men I nursed deeply regretted spending so much of their lives on the treadmill of a work existence.

By simplifying your lifestyle and making conscious choices along the way, it is possible to not need the income that you think you do. And by creating more space in your life, you become happier and more open to new opportunities, ones more suited to your new lifestyle.

 

3. I WISH I’D HAD THE COURAGE TO EXPRESS MY FEELINGS.

Many people suppressed their feelings in order to keep peace with others. As a result, they settled for a mediocre existence and never became who they were truly capable of becoming. Many developed illnesses relating to the bitterness and resentment they carried as a result.

We cannot control the reactions of others. However, although people may initially react when you change the way you are by speaking honestly, in the end it raises the relationship to a whole new and healthier level. Either that or it releases the unhealthy relationship from your life. Either way, you win.

 

4. I WISH I HAD STAYED IN TOUCH WITH MY FRIENDS.

Often they would not truly realise the full benefits of old friends until their dying weeks and it was not always possible to track them down. Many had become so caught up in their own lives that they had let golden friendships slip by over the years. There were many deep regrets about not giving friendships the time and effort that they deserved. Everyone misses their friends when they are dying.

It is common for anyone in a busy lifestyle to let friendships slip. But when you are faced with your approaching death, the physical details of life fall away. People do want to get their financial affairs in order if possible. But it is not money or status that holds the true importance for them. They want to get things in order more for the benefit of those they love. Usually though, they are too ill and weary to ever manage this task. It is all comes down to love and relationships in the end. That is all that remains in the final weeks, love and relationships.

 

5. I WISH THAT I HAD LET MYSELF BE HAPPIER.

This is a surprisingly common one. Many did not realise until the end that happiness is a choice. They had stayed stuck in old patterns and habits. The so-called ‘comfort’ of familiarity overflowed into their emotions, as well as their physical lives. Fear of change had them pretending to others, and to their selves, that they were content. When deep within, they longed to laugh properly and have silliness in their life again. When you are on your deathbed, what  others think of you is a long way from your mind. How wonderful to be able to let go and smile again, long before you are dying.

 

Life is a choice. It is YOUR life. Choose consciously, choose wisely, choose honestly. Choose happiness.

Original Source

10 Clear Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Care What Others Think. – Thousand Thoughts

Thousand Thoughts

It is human nature to want to be liked and accepted. However, this often leads to people worrying too much about what others are thinking about them.

This kind of excessive worrying can have a negative effect on your life. It can be so debilitating that it interferes with your ability to feel at ease with yourself and around others. Do not let it prevent you from living your life to the fullest potential.

Here are ten reasons why you should not care about what others think:

1. It’s Not Their Life, So It’s None Of Their Business

People are entitled to think whatever they want, just as you are entitled to think what you want. What people think of you cannot change who you are or what you are worth, unless you allow them to.

This is your life to live. At the end of the day you are the only person who needs to approve of your own choices.

2. They Don’t Know What’s Best For You

Nobody will ever be as invested in your life as you. Only you know what is best for you, and that entails learning from your own choices. The only way you will ever truly learn is through making your own decisions, taking full responsibility for them, and that way if you do fail, at least you can learn from it wholeheartedly, as opposed to blaming somebody else.

3. What’s Right For Someone Else May Be Completely Wrong For You

It’s important to recognize that someone’s opinion is often based on whatthey would do. This alone is the problem. What is best for somebody else, can be the worst thing for you. What one person considers garbage can be another person’s treasure. We are all so unique. Only you know what is right for you.

4. It Will Keep You From Your Dreams

If you are constantly worried about what other people think, you will never get to where you need to go in life. You are going to have to do things that don’t always meet people’s standards. You will come into situations where you have to put your pride, and your reputation on the line to get what you want. If you are constantly worried about what people are thinking, you will never have the will to do what’s right.

5. You’re The One Stuck With The End Result

In life, you are the one stuck with the consequences of your decisions. For example, if someone suggests you buy some stocks, but you just don’t feel like it’s the right choice, you are the only one who will live the consequences. If the stock falls and you lose a lot of money, you are the one that will have to live with the fact that you didn’t follow your inner call. When people give you their suggestions or even orders, there is no risk for them. They don’t have to live with your choices—but you do.

6. People’s Thoughts Change On A Regular Basis

We are constantly changing. Some philosophers and theorists suggest that we are in a constant state of flux, so much that we cannot even say we have one, specific ‘self’ (or a fixed personality). People’s thoughts, ideas and views change on a regular basis.

That means even if somebody does think badly of you at the moment, there is a good chance they will think differently in the near future. So basically, people’s thoughts don’t really matter.

7. Life Is Simply Too Short

You only have one life to live, so why would you spend it worrying about other people’s opinions? Do whatever you want, be whoever you want. You’re not going to see these people after you’re dead. You probably won’t even see them in a year from now. Live your life without worrying about other people’s thoughts and opinion, and you will live your life to the maximum.

8. You Reap What You Sow

Worrying too much about what other people think of you can become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Frequently, people indulge their need to be liked so much so that it actually dictates to the way they behave. Some become people-pleasers or so submissive that many people are turned off. The behavior you use as an attempt to ensure you are liked may actually cause you to be disliked.

9. Others Don’t Care As Much As You Think

People generally don’t think outside themselves a great deal of time. It is a sad but simple truth that the average person filters their world through their ego, meaning that they think about most things in terms of “me” or “my”.

This means that, unless who you are or what you have done directly affects another person or their life, they are unlikely to spend much time thinking about you at all.

10. The Hard Truth: It’s Impossible To Please Everybody

You can’t please all of the people all of the time. It is impossible to live up to everyone’s expectations so there is no point in burning yourself out trying to do so. Just make sure that one of the people you please is yourself!

Conclusion

The weight of other’s thought can become a burden for you. It can inhibit you from living your life, because your entire being (your personality, your thoughts, your actions) are controlled by an idealized standard of what people want to see. When you become so obsessed with other people’s opinion of you, you forget your own.

You can make a conscious effort to stop giving a damn; to let yourself free. It’s a skill that needs to be practiced, like meditating. But once you truly understand how to let go, you will see the world as entirely different.

Once you give up catering to other people’s opinion and thoughts, you will find out who you truly are, and that freedom will be like taking a breath for the first time.

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